Review: Miller and The Hunks – & Jeff…Part II

On Valentine’s Day, Columbus, OH quartet Miller and The Hunks (@millerhunks) will release the EP & titled & Jeff…Part II, which is the perfect day to showcase the romance-themed alternative/new wave album. Lead singer, synthesist, and sole songwriter Colin Miller has concocted six tracks that most people can relate to during these stressful social times. This record ought to be a big hit with concertgoers when the band performs live this Saturday, February 17 with solid support from The Turbos, The A.M. Soul Society, and Courtney From Work.

Recorded in Nashville, the EP kicks off with “Need to Know”, a tune with slick synthesizer play, solid drum work, and a crisp guitar rift in the first 30 seconds. The track starts at a slightly slower pace than normal Hunks fare, but in about the middle things pick up to provide head and fist bangers something to rock out to. The second track “Sex Ain’t Love” is appropriate for the upcoming romantic holiday and is a commentary on lust’s impact on judgment and fulfillment. This is sure to be a track that garners the band a great deal of empathy from the horny and empty.

The third song, “I Don’t Care” starts slow but introduces crunchy guitars and Miller’s wailing a half-minute later. This is the one track that should remind listeners of The Killers, although for the most part Colin Miller and Brandon Flowers’ vocals are separate entities. The song could be in either group’s set list and not seem out of place. The next tune “Sided System” is straight out of 1984 and works here as one of the album’s ballads. The standards of radio-friendly tracks back in the day were different and this would have soared up the charts three decades ago.

The 1980s are alive and well on the fifth song “Waste Your Time”, which should draw comparisons to Wall Of Voodoo and R.E.M. of 30 years ago. It also sounds like it would be brilliant for radio play on Alternative stations. The last track is “Meat You Again” and is the record’s second ballad and is jazzed up much more than “Sided System”. This will be the slow-dance jam of the night at the upcoming concert. Perhaps Miller can market this song to high schoolers just in time for prom season.

& Jeff…Part II is a melting pot of genres, styles, and speeds which works like a charm for Miller and The Hunks. Colin is known for mixing things up on each album and this record is no different. It prevents the band from becoming stale and pigeonholed, which would only harm its fan base. The band can be randy, funny, and serious all in one album. It is probably the reason why they have been going strong for the past several years. Fans of their prior releases will likely enjoy what the group has presented here and due to the EP’s diversity, some fencesitters might embrace it as well.

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Review: Earwig’s Gibson Under Mountain

Columbus, Ohio outfit Earwig (@earwigtheband) is considered an “underground” band, however, after getting a dose of the 2011 album Gibson Under Mountain, it is amazing this band has not received their due. In anticipation of the record’s re-release on February 13, it is appropriate to introduce younger alternative rock aficionados to this group who seemed to bubble under mainstream fame, but not quite get the spotlight. It might not be too late for them to get some well-deserved recognition, though.

The first track, “Trees”, starts slow but picks up the pace within a matter of seconds. It is a remarkable opener and is just the tip of the iceberg of what Earwig offers. Lead singer and songwriter Lizard McGee penned himself a would-be hit with “Star Cross’d”, a tune that includes backup from Casey Cooper from highly regarded Columbus rock duo The Receiver. The third song, “Not About You”, is another solid example of McGee’s songwriting skills at play. Also, the album clicks due to production from McGee and Mike Landolt along with superb musicianship from bassist Matt Wagner, drummer Justin Crooks, and percussionist George Hondroulis.

Although McGee writes great zero-to-sixty alternative rock tracks, but he has some power ballads in his arsenal. The fourth song, “Her Heart”, is one of them and it includes help from backing vocalist Andy Harrison and organist Thom Boyer. This record also includes a prolific holiday song “Next Christmas” that deals with the travesty of drugs during a would-be festive time of year. These are fine examples of McGee’s wide creativity range and if he were interested in writing and producing songs for other artists, they would be in excellent hands with him in charge.

The remainder of Gibson Under Mountain reeks of awesomeness that alternative rock fans love and miss as the genre gets more computerized and sanitized. A surefire radio smash is “Glorious & Gloom” that with the right label support would go straight to the top. Ditto the Death Cab-esque “Shiny Morning”. The record ends on a smashing note with “Rumplestiltskin”, the record’s longest track by a country mile. From start to finish, the album is a fantastic effort worth more critical and commercial acclaim than received seven years ago. The re-release will give alternative rock buffs a throwback to the days of Blink-182, Flickerstick, among others.

The fact that the band did not get the major label contract worthy of their work is highly baffling. Per the band’s Wikipedia page, for a time there certainly was interest from labels but it was not to be. Undeterred, McGee went the DIY route by opening up LFM Records. The group is in good company with other respected locals on the cusp of the big time such as Watershed, Templeton, and Miranda Sound. Word is that in addition to the Gibson Under Mountain re-release more than a week away, new material is coming soon. 2018 might just be the year Earwig breaks through like never before.

Artist Spotlight: Pete Mako

Pete Mako (@PeteTheShark) is an Australian-born singer-songwriter who has primarily focused on performing science-fiction themed acoustic alternative music. Currently based in Columbus, OH, the 10-year industry veteran’s creativity, fascination with peculiar subjects, hard work ethic, and high-energy concerts make him one of the more sought after and standout artists in the local scene. His two full-length efforts are chock full of 19 different audio comic books between them that paint a vivid picture in listeners’ minds.

Mako’s first LP, 2015’s Relationships with Monsters, contains the would-be radio hits “So Far Away” and “Apparition of Love”.  These tracks demonstrate his ability to write mainstream songs in addition to those with a supernatural tone. Other notable tracks on Mako’s debut record are the high-octane “Full Moon’s Glow”, the ballad “Not Just Another Day”, and “Solomon Grundy”. Slickly engineered by Trevor Boggs, Mako went the DIY route on the record playing all parts himself. This is a perfect demonstration of his versatility that would serve him well later in his career.

One year later, Mako dropped The Undead Life, a Ka-Tet Records release that continues his previous album’s sci-fi theme. Much like Relationships with Monsters, Trevor Boggs was involved in this record’s creation. The 10-song album fuses unique songwriting, alpha male vocals, and spot-on acoustic guitar play into an alternative masterpiece. The fourth track, which shares a title with The X Files’ tagline “The Truth is Out There”, name drops David Duchovny’s character and is a nice ode to the recently revived TV series. Mako collaborates from time to time and on the record’s fifth tune “Haunted Trans Am”, Two Years Later mastermind Jamie Rogers contributed backing vocals. Days of the New and Peter Searcy fans will enjoy Mako’s vigor in delivering another quality album that includes songs about vampire romance (“Bite Me”), prostitution (“The Witch of West Hollywood”), and a cowardly dog (“Courage”).

For a time, Mako had his own backing band The Boogie Men who did live shows, but he eventually returned to his roots of going it alone. As of late, however, he has played bass in the supergroup Roxy Mae where he has joined vocalist/guitarist and charter member Matt Starr and Two Years Later co-founder and drummer Zak Toth. Whether it is with his new band or his unplugged solo work, 2018 is bound to be a huge year for Mako. With the sky being the limit for the self-proclaimed ‘Rock N’ Roll Devil’, he and his fans are on their way to experiencing the ride of their lives.

Artist to Watch: Miller and The Hunks

Columbus, Ohio’s Miller and The Hunks (@millerhunks) perform highly prolific alternative music that is difficult to pin down. Some songs are slow, some go at three-fourths speed, and a few are pedal to the metal headbangers. One would imagine that was lead singer and songwriter Colin Miller’s mission from the start. It prevents the brand containing his namesake from going stale and being pigeonholed into one sub-classification. He has succeeded in ensuring listeners get a surprise with every song. Going back to the group’s origins a couple of years ago, the band has dropped seven different Bandcamp releases of synth-laden, guitar-rocking, and drum-banging alternative pop rock. Each record is more prolific than the previous. As the group gets ready to headline a show serving as a bouillabaisse of genres this Wednesday, November 15, here is a summary of each albums’ standout tracks in which some are sure to be part of their upcoming set.

From April 2015’s Purely Sexual, one outstanding tune is the surefire smash “I Want Out”, which is also a popular track the band plays live.  A major label would have to summon a radio edit version as the song contains Miller spouting the F-bomb a couple of times. Another fantastic one from this 13-song album is the piano-heavy ballad “Happy Days” which could be a Hot AC or Top 40 chart hit. “Blue Dream”, however, is one guitar-heavy gem that would be right at home at hard rock stations nationwide.

Later that year, Miller and The Hunks released two holiday-themed singles “Last Halloween” and “Hunkmas”. The former is a soothing, bluesy yet haunting tune that at the beginning sends a chill down one’s spine and picks up big time at the back half. The latter tune of 2015 is a Weezer-ish take on Christmas that just might be the best rocking song for the season. Parents be forewarned, much like the catchy “I Want Out”, listener discretion is advised for adult language. To be fair, it would not be authentic rock n’ roll without a little controversy from the band.

In August of 2016, the quartet which then consisted of Miller, guitarist Jon Leonard, bassist/backup vocalist Josiah Ogden, and now-defunct drummer Tommy Cheeseman commissioned the six-song EP Would You Like To Yes?. According to the Bandcamp page, the record is described as “a journey of an alt-rock EP, telling the story of the end of a life of a violent drug-addicted man.” The band turns what comes off as a tragedy in the blurb into some fantastic indie rock vibes that make people dance versus cry. “Drunk Driving” is a Walk The Moon-esque tune that will have folks dancing at live shows. They slow the pace down a few notches on “Good Heavens” a brooding bluesy song that shows some fantastic guitar work from Leonard and vibrant vocals from Miller and Ogden.

In the fall of that same year, Miller and The Hunks bestowed the single “Stapled Shut” upon indie rock enthusiasts. It is another one of their tracks that would warrant a radio edit, but this time it would be due to time constraints. The unedited version clocks in at approximately five and a half minutes. It would not be until July of this year that they released new music, providing the public with another live show favorite titled “Creativity”, although likely known at shows as “I Wanna Dance”. That is a tune that lives up to its lyrics and gets crowds going each time it is played at concerts.

Last month, this time with Ethan Joseph behind the kit, Miller and The Hunks released the eight-song album And Jeff: Part 1. It lives up to the group’s prior works while standing on its own merits. The record provides the Hunks’ standard mixture of alternative indie rock with a slightly heavier rock tune thrown in. On this album, “Wicked Tongue” is glorious hard rock presented only as the boys can do. “Gravity” is a melodic synth-pop jewel with provocative lyrics that the group has performed live and will likely do for Wednesday’s gig from the popular venue Spacebar featuring Los Angeles duo Dad & Steve, local project Golden Death Music, and Toledo-area post-hardcore band Castle No Kings. The sets will be limited in time, so fans will get only a sample of what Miller and The Hunks has to offer. Given Colin Miller’s ingenious songwriting and the band’s priceless execution, even an abbreviated set is sure to satisfy audiences.

Artist on the Rise: Greenjeans

Greenjeans (@greenjeansband) is a decade-old Columbus, OH-based indie rock outfit who just missed out on this millennium’s garage rock invasion. These lads deserve to be stars based on what they have recorded thus far and it is only a matter of time before they break through and get a chance to shine.

The most recent lineup consists of singer/guitarist (and songwriter) Dave Durham, drummer Eric Slaback, guitarist Marko Skugor, keyboardist Johnny Riddle, and bassist Colin Giacalone. An earlier lineup recorded the 2014 album Cave Demos, which encompasses the raw, gritty style brought to the alternative radio stations for a time by The Strokes, Jet, among others. The mixing is unpolished, making it even more of a garage rock masterpiece. One should not mind if this record becomes re-mastered one day once the band gets a record deal, just so long as the suits do not tinker with Durham’s work too much.

Cave Demos features the eerie “Lullaby”, which is the album’s shortest tune and would be brilliant at the end of a horror film. “Something to Do” is one of the tracks that would be amazing on alternative rock radio back in the early 2000s and it would be great on today’s radio. “Sign of the Times” is the track that is the most Strokes-esque with Durham giving Julian Casablancas a run for his money. Other notable throwbacks from this record are “Sleezeball” and “Weirdos (Dumb & In Love)” The industry is cyclical, therefore maybe there is hope for Greenjeans to make the charts one day along with the resurgences of The Hives, The Datsuns, and the like.

In March of this year, Greenjeans released the new single “Vuvuzela” that is a departure from the group’s prior work. The track is more of a psychedelic surfer rock song that clocks in at over five minutes, which would warrant a radio edit version for it to make it to air. It, much like the Cave Demos tracks, is written and performed brilliantly. On Friday, October 20 the band will be gracing the stage in their hometown. Perhaps they will mix it up with some vintage and modern indie rock, but whatever they choose to play it should be an amazing night indie rock enthusiasts will want to be part of.

Review: Hello Luna – Ghost of You

In April of 2016, Columbus, Ohio-based alternative rock outfit Hello Luna (@hellolunaband) released the well-received debut single “Stitching Holes” leaving aficionados craving more. This year, the band dropped the EP Ghost of You in a sold out PromoWest venue and to solid reviews thus far. For those desiring a throwback to the late 1990s alternative sound with a modern twist, this record is the thirst quencher.

The bookend tracks on the five-song album are the most mainstream Alternative and Top 40 radio ready of the bunch. The first tune is “Sound & Sorrow” for which Hello Luna shot a spot-on video to premiere the song, directed by the company Loose Films. It starts slow with vocalist/lead guitarist Kenzie Coyne playing lightly and crooning and then drummer Michael Neumaier tickling the cymbals shortly thereafter. The song’s middle absolutely rocks listeners’ socks off with superb play from Coyne, Neumaier, and bassist Diego Villasmil before the band takes it down several notches to how the song started.

 

The fifth track “Half Asleep” is the other standout track that with label support will easily climb the charts. All three Hello Luna members play their roles vigorously with the image of each rocking out during the song’s recording. Performed live, this is clearly the most headbanging track of the night. This not a band to mess with and they are not one to miss on tour.

 

The EP’s middle tracks are solid works that fill the album out nicely. The bass-heavy “Empathy” is where veteran musician Villasmil really gets to shine and compliments Coyne’s dove-like vocals well as she repeats the album’s title multiple times. The third tune ‘Underwater” is a favorite live in concert with Neumaier’s drumming syncing up with Coyne’s guitar playing perfectly. As for Ghost of You’s shortest song “Tell Me”, figurative decapitation is mentioned on more than one occasion and Coyne is short and to the point with the guitar and vocals.

 

Hello Luna is back to being a quartet with the recent addition of Eric Morgan, giving them even more firepower when they record again. It certainly gives them a great deal more ammunition when gracing a stage. This four-piece is a hybrid of old school favorites Superdrag and new school favorites Wolf Alice and anyone lucky to hear Ghost of You via CD, live streaming, or in person is in for the ride of their lives.

Review: So Long, Stargazer’s ‘Look Up’

Columbus, Ohio’s So Long, Stargazer (@solongstargazer) is a young, energetic quartet consisting of Chase McCants (vocals, synthesizers), Kristin Green (vocals, keyboards), Nick Wray (drums), and Tommy Davis (guitars).  Founded two years back, the group played live to get the word out, which served as anticipation for 2016 debut LP titled Look Up. The album is unlike anything that has dropped in recent memory, making it one of the standouts on the indie music radar.

The record is the epitome of variety, featuring both McCants and Green sharing lead vocals on some tunes and then one or the other handling lead on others. Look Up comes with a late 1990/early 2000s sound to it, when radio was more diverse and bands could chart across multiple genres. The band deserves a great deal of success now, but had they released this album about 20 years ago SLS would be in the same conversation with Blessid Union of Souls, Sarah McLachlan, Keane, Anna Nalick, among others. That is great musical company to be in and they would have skyrocketed up the charts along with said acts.

For instance, the second track “Rewind” could do well on today’s Hot AC chart. The way all individual parts just melt together makes for a tasty musical grilled cheese sandwich. McCants’ canary-like vocals are on display here and blend in with Green’s keyboard work, Wray’s on-point drumming, and solid guitar play from Davis. On the other hand, carried by its vocals “Wreckage” is a spot-on tune that would fit at R&B stations. If only two minutes longer, “Drink the Sin” would slay on Hot AC or CHR Pop stations, giving SLS one of its more crossover tunes in today’s times.

Two decades ago, there was more diversity on the airwaves and that is where the bulk of Look Up would have fit like a glove. McCants, Green, Wray, and Davis should be commended for making the music they feel like making despite what industry big wigs choose to currently peddle. Here is hoping they can breakthrough and attract the attention they deserve. Even though the album is rock solid, their live events are a sight to behold and in this era of hip-hop, electronica, pop, and folk rock will be what carries them forward.

Further diversifying the album, Green gets to show off her singing chops on tracks such as “From Detroit to Toledo”, “To the Hour”, and “Weightless”. These tracks could do damage on AC and Hot AC stations with the right record company behind them. If/when either vocalist is ready to fly solo, those records are going to be in high demand on the scene.

Listeners should not let the LP being 14 tracks deter them as the different song lengths on Look Up balance out the album rather nicely. So Long, Stargazer’s musicianship is undisputed, however, due to the album’s hodgepodge and the current radio state a record company will have to work hard in marketing it. Outside of staunch metalheads, the record has just about something for everyone, which makes it appealing to fans who like multiple genres. The downside is by being so difficult to pin down to one radio format, major labels may not be up for the challenge. That would be a shame as the record is superb musically top to finish, but business is about calculated risks so it would be great for a label to step up and give these hard-working lads a chance. As far as the record goes, the listening public ought to follow suit.

 

Photo courtesy of the band’s website

Review: Two Years Later’s ‘Say It To My Face’

Columbus, Ohio’s alternative rock act Two Years Later (@2YLBand) ambitiously released two records in 2016 with the latest (and third overall) being Say it to My Face. As evidenced by the title, the record is themed as a revenge record with songwriter/lead vocalist/guitarist Jamie Rogers exacting payback against those who wronged her by way of melodic pop-punk music and a few ballads mixed in. In turn, these tunes can be relatable to others who have experienced similar dilemmas and seek healing, which they can also get through Rogers’ creative venting. Fans are forewarned that although disappointing relationships and/or life experiences are the norm on the album, one-third of the tracks is a departure of what they have heard on prior albums.

The title track is a brilliant clap-along 40-second intro to the album that takes one right to “#sorrynotsorry”, which was featured on the band’s first record. With its solid guitar and drum work, it is a rock anthem would fit right in on Alternative radio stations’ playlists. “That’s Not Ladylike” calls out the contradiction of women’s current beauty standards and Rogers’ vocals are on fire as she awesomely rants about the hypocrisy within mainstream and social media.

Say it to My Face’s fourth track, “Linger”, is different from Two Years Later’s trademark sound as it is reminiscent of the Santana and Michelle Branch collaboration “The Game of Love” sped up a tad. The song is one to salsa to and has potential to be a crossover hit across multiple formats. “Tonight, Tonight” is a standard part of Two Years Later’s playbook with sheer brilliance on guitar from Chandler Eggleston (also the tune’s co-writer), banging on-point drumming out of the group’s co-founder Zak Toth, and bombastic bass work and backing vocals by Mike Johnson. It is one of the album’s headbangers, making it a crowd favorite at live shows.

Yet another popular song at concerts that made the album is the call-out “Let Me Down Easy”, in which Rogers expresses self-depreciation for falling for false charms all the while chastising the culprit for his cons. Those not familiar with Two Years Later’s work should be warned that although Rogers writes and performs PG songs, this one contains strong adult language. Without approval of a radio edit, the song will not see the light of day on terrestrial radio stations. It makes those who love it obligated to hear it by attending a show or buying the album, but that is only a benefit to Two Years Later’s economic success.

An atypical track from Two Years Later, “California is Calling” slows the album back down as the ballad explores escaping a bad experience through an entire change of scenery. It also criticizes the antagonist’s actions and insufficient compensation attempts as the protagonist moves on with her life. Formerly a concert exclusive, “Never What You Wanted” is on millennials’ soundtracks as it deals with monkey wrenches getting in the way of society’s life manifests. The final tune on Say it to My Face is “Lullaby of Bitter Things”, which showcases Rogers’ vocals with some wicked ukulele playing. If the group wishes to take a huge risk, they can release it as a single and see it soar up the Adult Contemporary chart gaining them even more fans.

The band is on indefinite hiatus from touring and recording as for the time being, principal songwriter and lead singer Rogers is focusing on electronic/acoustic side project Kitty Pause. Thus, casual and diehard fans need to stay interested in the group’s work as it may encourage a reunion sooner versus later.  Much like Say it to My Face, when Two Years Later does return they will come back with a vengeance.

With Album Release Upcoming, Cadence Blues Band Has Nothing to Cry About

The Cadence Blues Band (@TheCadenceBlues) may be a newcomer to the Columbus music scene, but their style and sound prove they have an old school mindset. There is already a buzz surrounding the trio as their EP The Seed officially drops next Friday, November 11 at a live show at The Shrunken Head. The young, psychedelic bluesy rockers have the talent to make a good run on the festival and dive scene, which means steady coin for years to come.

The EP starts off moody and haunting courtesy of the over five-minute piece titled ‘No Need’. This tune is a vehicle for vocalist Tony Gregorc to show off. It is the record’s ultimate campfire hippie anthem. This should be no surprise to its growing fan base as per the band’s Facebook profile, the group lists Hendrix and Zeppelin among their influences. One who pays attentions to the song’s lyrics will understand how relevant they were 50 years ago and now, especially with Election Day creeping up.

The pace picks up with track ‘So Damn Excited!’, a hybrid of blues meeting classic rock. If Q-FM 96 ever added this song into its rotation, it would fit into the playlist flawlessly. That stations’ avid listeners are people who thrived in the bar scene and Columbus needs to have throwbacks show millennials how it’s done.

‘Makenna’ is notable for drummer Ty Phillips-Bond’s on-point percussion, but of course he does a solid job from top to bottom on the album. Gregorc’s range gets put to the test on the track, despite this being The Seed’s shortest song. Taking the speed down a couple of notches is the song ‘(More Than) Just a Word’, which sounds like a sped-up ballad that people can move their bodies to.

Lastly, ‘How to Be a Rolling Stone’ is a genius mashup that demonstrates a 1970s attitude with 1990s arrangement. The song is so brilliant, it would be deemed a hit in both distinct decades. Gregorc and bassist Steve Simeon’s vocals are sheer perfection on the album’s final track.

When The Cadence Blues Band takes the stage in one week’s time, if the audience close their eyes and open their minds they will think they are back at the original (and best) Woodstock. They will be joined by solid opening acts Mystic Mamba and Punchdrunk Tagalongs. Per the group’s Twitter bio, Cadence describe themselves as, “A high energy, groove inducing, retro style blues-rock trio formed in Columbus, OH that creates soulful songs with a message, and performs them with feeling!” It is crystal clear The Seed captured this and a whole lot more, but that the live show will be even groovier.

Sam and The Barbers Definitely Make The Cut

Indie rock trio Sam and The Barbers (@samandbarbers) have provided a sample of what they have to offer the industry on their new four-song EP End of the World and alternative music’s future is great shape because of it. What vocalist/guitarist Derrick Walter, drummer Brett Williams, and synthesist Paul Strawser have constructed demonstrates a bright outlook for them in the years to come.

The band’s name is an ironic one as at no time since their inception has any band member been named Sam and none of them are or have been hair stylists. According to their October 2015 video interview with the university’s publication The Lantern, the band is named for American composer Samuel Barber, who Walter noticed had a noun for his last name and thought it was a good idea to keep the same band name format that has worked for Katrina & The Waves, Huey Lewis & News, among others.  The Columbus, OH band was formed by high school friends and former Ohio State University undergrads Walter and Williams. During their college stint and after several lineup changes, fellow student Strawser joined and magic has been made ever since. That has resulted in positive feedback for their high energy, spot-on live shows around town and now critical acclaim for the EP released just this year.

End of the World has potential radio hits across the board all the while maintaining musical integrity sometimes lost in mainstream music. The opening track titled ‘Everyone Here’ is a synthesizer and drum driven tune that has teenage rom-com soundtrack written all over it, and that is a good thing. Walter’s guitar-playing comes in about 90 seconds into it and takes the track to another level. His solid lead vocals give it a boost to create some static on the Alternative and Adult Rock radio charts.  The EP’s title track is a faster-paced synth-laden track that should also not be ignored by rock radio and by alternative music lovers.

It is End of the World’s middle two tracks that with the right people backing them will make Sam and The Barbers well-known. ‘I Promise I’ll Never Promise Again’ is a high-energy modern rock track that exudes influence from Vampire Weekend, Arctic Monkeys, and the like. ‘1982’, written by Walter, is a fun throwback that has a 1980s new wave vibe to it yet has enough relevance to be a surefire Top 10 Alternative smash and cross over to CHR Pop stations (you know, the ones that carry Ryan Seacrest’s ‘American Top 40’).

During their live shows, Sam and The Barbers have included a handful of other catchy rock tracks along with a unique take on the Talking Heads tune ‘Once in A Lifetime’. The next chance alternative rock enthusiasts can see and hear the hoopla for themselves is Saturday, June 18 when they invade Woodlands Tavern to open a show featuring Chicago pop punk quintet Aiming For Average and local rockers Two Years Later. It is in modern rock fans’ best interest to become familiar with these three upstanding and talented gentlemen before their careers explode and they become inaccessible.