Artist on the Rise: Greenjeans

Greenjeans (@greenjeansband) is a decade-old Columbus, OH-based indie rock outfit who just missed out on this millennium’s garage rock invasion. These lads deserve to be stars based on what they have recorded thus far and it is only a matter of time before they break through and get a chance to shine.

The most recent lineup consists of singer/guitarist (and songwriter) Dave Durham, drummer Eric Slaback, guitarist Marko Skugor, keyboardist Johnny Riddle, and bassist Colin Giacalone. An earlier lineup recorded the 2014 album Cave Demos, which encompasses the raw, gritty style brought to the alternative radio stations for a time by The Strokes, Jet, among others. The mixing is unpolished, making it even more of a garage rock masterpiece. One should not mind if this record becomes re-mastered one day once the band gets a record deal, just so long as the suits do not tinker with Durham’s work too much.

Cave Demos features the eerie “Lullaby”, which is the album’s shortest tune and would be brilliant at the end of a horror film. “Something to Do” is one of the tracks that would be amazing on alternative rock radio back in the early 2000s and it would be great on today’s radio. “Sign of the Times” is the track that is the most Strokes-esque with Durham giving Julian Casablancas a run for his money. Other notable throwbacks from this record are “Sleezeball” and “Weirdos (Dumb & In Love)” The industry is cyclical, therefore maybe there is hope for Greenjeans to make the charts one day along with the resurgences of The Hives, The Datsuns, and the like.

In March of this year, Greenjeans released the new single “Vuvuzela” that is a departure from the group’s prior work. The track is more of a psychedelic surfer rock song that clocks in at over five minutes, which would warrant a radio edit version for it to make it to air. It, much like the Cave Demos tracks, is written and performed brilliantly. On Friday, October 20 the band will be gracing the stage in their hometown. Perhaps they will mix it up with some vintage and modern indie rock, but whatever they choose to play it should be an amazing night indie rock enthusiasts will want to be part of.

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Album Review: We Were The Vexies

Cleveland quintet The Vexies’ debut LP We Were The Vexies is a non-cookie cutter record indie rock enthusiasts will be proud of. Per their Bandcamp page, singer and rhythm guitarist Ray wrote most of the album, which was produced by Jimmy Wilkens and mastered by Gabe Swarts. Rounding out the five-piece are lead guitarist Wilhelm Bruening (and singer on the third track), vocalist/tambourine player Kelly Porter-Santamaria, bassist Michael Oswald, and drummer Matt Ebinger. Together, the group put together an album in which could see some major play with the right marketing.

The Vexies are a clone of no one, which makes their album a delight to hear in a multitude of places. The songs have a happy-go-lucky, free spirited feel to them. For instance, the last track on the 10-song record titled “Two Bullets” doesn’t tell a sun-shiny story but how it is executed by the band is sheer brilliance and will have folks singing along to the chorus on road trips and at live shows.

“Shhh!” is the album’s only tune to be written and sung by Bruening and has a real 1960s surfer rock vibe to it. Porter-Santamaria also has singing duties on this song and helps reinforce its beach party dance feel. Regarding the record’s other nine songs, Ray states on Bandcamp, “Some people can go through life blaming everybody else, but that doesn’t work for me. Facing these flaws and admitting they exist is the only way I can get to them. So I sing about it.”

Other notables from We Were The Vexies are the hoppy surf rock song “Whoa! Horsey”, the throwback “On 2nd Thought”, and “Big Bad Wolf”. The entire record is one that would not be out of place being played in a supermarket, doctor’s office, or local diner. The Vexies have concocted a series of tracks with substance that are soothing despite the grim subject matter. In a twist, because of how easygoing the songs are laid out, listeners will get a sense of pleasure from the songwriters’ pain. It is advised one access the album online or hear these tunes at a live show to get a taste of the storytelling Ray and Bruening have served up.

Big Apple Band Taking A Major Bite Out Of The Industry

New York-group Black Statues (@BlackStatues) are on their way to becoming a serious player in the independent music scene. They may not have a record deal right now, but after hearing “Tie One On”, their debut single, it should not be long before legions of underground music enthusiasts get a taste of what this quartet has to offer.

The group was founded three years ago by transplants vocalist Maude Quill and guitarist Edward Raison. Both are veterans of the business having played with other artists many years ago. After working on the demos for their recently released album, the pair recruited keyboardist Steven Vallone and then drummer Joe Izzo. From there, it was time to find a producer for their recordings. That’s where legend Earl Slick, who has worked with the likes of David Bowie and John Lennon, came into play. With Slick’s production chops and the mastering of Randy Merrill, the release ‘Gloss Cannon’ became a reality.

The record is available now at the band’s official site as well as CD Baby and iTunes. Track “Tie One On” is only one of the group’s great efforts to take the scene by storm. It is a beautiful hybrid of current indie and old school rock, complimented by Quill’s haunting vocals. Don’t take this blogger’s word for it, though. Survey the video to see and hear the raw sounds of Black Statues right here. If you can, it would be worthwhile to see Black Statues live. The group has some one-offs booked in the New York area. Independent music lovers should want ‘Gloss Cannon’ and its first single to catch on so the group can bring their ingenious sound to stages everywhere.