Review: “Get Loose” by The Old Adage

Detroit pop duo The Old Adage (@TheOldAdage) look to dance their way up the charts with their newest single.  24 seconds into the video for “Get Loose”, the party gets popping and craziness ensues. It is a trippy video with the cocaine scene from ‘Scarface’ re-enacted, people in animal outfits living it up, a live dog wearing a shirt, and glitter everywhere. Directed by the tandem of Justin Collins and Randy Williams, “Get Loose” is a very wild wide for approximately four minutes and it appeared everyone making the video had a blast.

Siblings Mimi and Nino Chavez express a great deal of charisma in the video and show this is not their first rodeo. The group has been around the block several times having formed the band nearly five years ago under a different name and with lineup changes along the way. They have started to find their groove, though, with two records under their belt. The first being the EP Matches and last year’s full-length Cycles, the latter of which contains “Get Loose”. Both albums are available at the band’s website and major streaming outlets everywhere.

On “Get Loose”, Mimi’s vocals are on par with the other pop divas invading Ryan Seacrest’s Top 40 each week. The beats are on point with the vocals making for a dance track sure to get clubs worldwide jumping and bumping. Although the album containing this gem has been released without label support, if it gets in the right hands or heard by the right ears, there is no reason “Get Loose” cannot become a bonafide smash. The chops and professionalism are certainly there to make it happen.

Ultimately, this single and accompanying video are about escapism and letting it all hang out. Those who hear and see it will surely get that vibe real quick and have themselves an awesome time.  The Old Adage will do their part in making sure they bring the party at their live shows and hopefully, dance pop fans will show their support by viewing the video, buying the record, and spreading the word to make it the hit it ought to be.

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Artist on the Rise: Sunroof

Sunroof (@SunroofMusic) is an American musician who is self-described as playing electro-acoustic pop-rock. Montana resident Jeff Simpson started the dream in 2012 playing live shows within that year. Fast forward to 2013 and Sunroof made tracks available for sale at iTunes and other online retailers. Given the quality of what he has released so far, it is crystal clear this artist is on his way to having a very successful career.

“Brave”, the song featured in this video, is not a cover of the Sara Bareilles hit, but a track with Sunroof’s own unique acoustic poppy spin. It is a track that with label support, would have a chance to crack the Adult Top 40 and Hot AC charts. On his official Facebook, page he lists Ed Sheeran, Secondhand Serenade, and Owl City as influences. The Owl City-esque single “The Treehouse” is an inspiring, uplifting song for the upcoming season that the entire family can enjoy. “Atlantic Dreams” has legs as a dance club smash and mainstream pop hit with an Ellie Goulding vibe attached to it.

Although Sunroof’s 2014 touring plans have not been revealed as of yet, but he has the look, the sound, and the drive to be a success this year. He may be without a record deal now, but if the right people get an earshot of what he has offered thus far, it will not be too long before Sunroof has inked a contract. Remember the name and remember the tunes as there is a feeling Sunroof will make an impact in the music scene for years to come.

They Don’t Make Them Like They Used To

This song from 1987 hit #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the U.S. in addition to being a Top 20 smash in his native England and in Australia. This is when the singer was at his best. After legal mishaps and political controversies, it is too bad he may never have that same mainstream worldwide success again.

In Comparison, Plain Janes are Hotter than Average Joes

This track went to #1 on one chart, that chart being Billboard’s Hot Dance Singles Sales. The song made no impact on any other chart, however, the tune’s been used as background music for several TV programs. Some criticize the singer because she doesn’t have the genetic structure of a model, but hey, she’s talented, in good shape, and dresses well. I’ve seen regular looking male singers and this lady is miles sharper in appearance.